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Pain Research and Treatment
Volume 2011, Article ID 406235, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/406235
Research Article

Stop Using the Modified Work APGAR to Measure Job Satisfaction

1Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 722 West 168th Street Room 809, New York, NY 10032, USA
2Division of Physical Therapy, Department of Allied Health Sciences, School of Medicine and The Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
3Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, Gillings School of Global Public Health and the Thurston Arthritis Research Center, School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
4Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2R3
5Department of Medicine, School of Medicine and the Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA

Received 15 April 2011; Revised 25 August 2011; Accepted 14 September 2011

Academic Editor: Gen Inoue

Copyright © 2011 Thelma J. Mielenz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. The psychometric properties of the Modified Work APGAR (MWA) scale are not established, yet researchers use this scale as an overall measure of job satisfaction. Objective. Perform psychometric analyses on the MWA scale using data from two populations. Methods. A landmark occupational cohort and a clinical cohort are populations with low back pain studied. The first five items of the MWA scale measure social support from coworkers, one item measures dissatisfaction with job tasks, and the sixth item measures lack of social support from a supervisor. Exploratory principal components analyses were conducted in both cohorts. Results. In both cohorts, the first five items of the MWA scale loaded consistently onto one factor, social support from coworkers subscale. Conclusions. Unless researchers are interested in measuring social support from coworkers only, future studies should use other reliable and valid instruments to measure a broad range of psychosocial work characteristics.