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Pain Research and Treatment
Volume 2012, Article ID 840486, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/840486
Review Article

Combination Drug Therapy for Pain following Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, 1095 SW 14th Terrace, Miami, FL 33136, USA

Received 29 November 2011; Accepted 6 January 2012

Academic Editor: Carlo Luca Romanò

Copyright © 2012 Aldric Hama and Jacqueline Sagen. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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