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Pain Research and Treatment
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 178278, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/178278
Research Article

Loss of Central Inhibition: Implications for Behavioral Hypersensitivity after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

1Department of Cellular Biology and Pharmacology, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th Street, AHC2-481, Miami, FL 33199, USA
2The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, The University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA
3The Department of Neurological Surgery, The Neuroscience Program, The Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute, The University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA

Received 26 March 2014; Revised 30 June 2014; Accepted 10 July 2014; Published 10 August 2014

Academic Editor: Bjorn Meyerson

Copyright © 2014 Yerko A. Berrocal et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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