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Pain Research and Treatment
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 2473629, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2473629
Clinical Study

A Small Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial Comparing Mobile and Traditional Pain Coping Skills Training Protocols for Cancer Patients with Pain

1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
2Department of Internal Medicine, Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
3Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA

Received 25 July 2016; Revised 30 September 2016; Accepted 10 October 2016

Academic Editor: Stefan Evers

Copyright © 2016 Tamara J. Somers et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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