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Plastic Surgery International
Volume 2015, Article ID 383581, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/383581
Review Article

Stem Cell-Based Therapeutics to Improve Wound Healing

1Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
2Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
3Department of Surgery, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA
4Section of Plastic, Aesthetic and Reconstructive Surgery, Johannes Kepler University, Linz, Austria

Received 21 July 2015; Revised 13 October 2015; Accepted 15 October 2015

Academic Editor: Nicolo Scuderi

Copyright © 2015 Michael S. Hu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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