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Psyche
Volume 99, Issue 4, Pages 323-333
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/1992/20491

Strashila Incredibilis, a New Enigmatic Mecopteroid Insect With Possible Siphonapteran Affinities From the Upper Jurassic of Siberia

Paleontological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Profsoyuznaya 123, Moscow 117647, Russia

Received 22 July 1992

Copyright © 1992 A. P. Rasnitsyn.

Citations to this Article [26 citations]

The following is the list of published articles that have cited the current article.

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