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Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 575362, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/575362
Research Article

Blow Flies Visiting Decaying Alligators: Is Succession Synchronous or Asynchronous?

1Department of Biology, University of South Alabama, Life Sciences Building, Room 124, 307 University Boulevard, Mobile, AL 36688, USA
2Center for Vector Biology, Department of Entomology, Rutgers University-School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, 180 Jones Avenue, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA

Received 12 May 2008; Revised 27 August 2008; Accepted 15 September 2008

Academic Editor: Martin H. Villet

Copyright © 2009 Mark P. Nelder et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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