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Psyche
Volume 2011, Article ID 378576, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/378576
Research Article

Recruitment in Swarm-Founding Wasps: Polybia occidentalis Does not Actively Scent-Mark Carbohydrate Food Sources

1Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, 546 Russell Labs, 1630 Linden Drive, Madison, WI 53706, USA
2Departments of Statistics and Forest & Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, 1110 Medical Sciences Center, 1300 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706, USA
3Department of Entomology, University of Wisconsin, 546 Russell Labs, 1630 Linden Drive, Madison, WI 53706, USA

Received 28 February 2011; Accepted 2 April 2011

Academic Editor: James Charles Nieh

Copyright © 2011 Benjamin J. Taylor et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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