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Volume 2013, Article ID 465108, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/465108
Research Article

Ecological Observations of Native Geocoris pallens and G. punctipes Populations in the Great Basin Desert of Southwestern Utah

Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Hans-Knöll-Straße 8, 07745 Jena, Germany

Received 5 November 2012; Accepted 16 April 2013

Academic Editor: David G. James

Copyright © 2013 Meredith C. Schuman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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