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Volume 2013, Article ID 936341, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/936341
Research Article

Bacterial Infections across the Ants: Frequency and Prevalence of Wolbachia, Spiroplasma, and Asaia

1Department of Zoology, Field Museum of Natural History, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605, USA
2Committee on Evolutionary Biology, University of Chicago, 1025 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA

Received 21 February 2013; Accepted 30 May 2013

Academic Editor: David P. Hughes

Copyright © 2013 Stefanie Kautz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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