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Psyche
Volume 2013, Article ID 936341, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/936341
Research Article

Bacterial Infections across the Ants: Frequency and Prevalence of Wolbachia, Spiroplasma, and Asaia

1Department of Zoology, Field Museum of Natural History, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605, USA
2Committee on Evolutionary Biology, University of Chicago, 1025 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA

Received 21 February 2013; Accepted 30 May 2013

Academic Editor: David P. Hughes

Copyright © 2013 Stefanie Kautz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Supplementary Material

Supplementary Table 1: Supplementary Table 1 gives a complete list of samples used in this study. Sample name, ant species, location of collection, ant body part used, number of ants, comments are given. Also, the presence of each of the three bacterial symbionts investigated (i.e., Rickettsiales, Rhodospirillales, Entomoplasmatales) is noted together with number of OTUs per order, number of reads for each OTU and percentage of reads of each OTU.

Supplementary Table 2: Supplementary Table 2 contains a list of all sequences used for the construction of phylogenetic trees including our own data as generated through 454 pyrosequencing as well as the closest GenBank hits of our reads. GenBank accessions are given as well as host and taxnomomic classification according to the ribosomal database project (RDP) classifier. Three lists are given, one each for the orders Rickettsiales, Entomoplasmatales and Rhodospirillales.

Supplementary Figure 1: Supplementary Figure 1 shows a phylogenetic tree of Wolbachia symbionts associated with ants and their closest relatives with sequence data available in GenBank. A maximum likelihood phylogeny of the 16S rRNA region of bacterial symbionts is shown with branch lengths and support values. Bootstrap support >50 is indicated. The host name is given together with the GenBank accession number (GenBank sequences) or collection code (sequences generated in the present study). Rhizobium leguminosarum was used as an outgroup.

Supplementary Figure 2: Supplementary Figure 2 shows a phylogenetic tree of Spiroplasma-related ant symbionts and their closest relatives with sequence data available in GenBank. A maximum likelihood phylogeny of the 16S rRNA region of bacterial symbionts is shown with branch lengths and support values. Bootstrap support >50 is indicated. The host name is given together with the GenBank accession number (GenBank sequences) or collection code (sequences generated in the present study). Selenomonas ruminantium was used as an outgroup.

Supplementary Figure 3: Supplementary Figure 3 shows a phylogenetic tree of Asaia-related symbionts associated with ants and closest relatives with sequence data available in GenBank. A maximum likelihood phylogeny of the 16S rRNA region of bacterial symbionts is shown with branch lengths and support values. Bootstrap support >50 is indicated. The host name is given together with the GenBank accession number (GenBank sequences) or collection code (sequences generated in the present study). Wolbachia pipientis was used as an outgroup.

  1. Supplementary Materials
  2. Supplementary Materials