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Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 450785, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/450785
Research Article

Monitoring Spruce Budworm with Light Traps: The Effect of Trap Position

Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service-Atlantic Forestry Centre, P.O. Box 4000, Fredericton, NB, Canada E3B 5P7

Received 1 June 2014; Revised 19 August 2014; Accepted 25 September 2014; Published 4 November 2014

Academic Editor: Russell Jurenka

Copyright © 2014 Marc Rhainds and Edward G. Kettela. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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