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Psyche
Volume 2016, Article ID 3623092, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3623092
Research Article

Abrupt Geographical Transition between Aposematic Color Forms in the Spittlebug Prosapia ignipectus (Fitch) (Hemiptera: Cercopidae)

1Office of the President, Metropolitan College of New York, 60 West Street, New York, NY 10006, USA
2Department of Entomology, Division of Invertebrate Zoology, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024, USA
3Laboratório de Entomologia, Faculdade de Biociências, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Zoologia, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga 6681, 90619-900 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

Received 9 July 2016; Accepted 29 September 2016

Academic Editor: Ai-Ping Liang

Copyright © 2016 Vinton Thompson and Gervasio S. Carvalho. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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