Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Psyche
Volume 2017, Article ID 4520109, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4520109
Research Article

The First Workers of the Ant Camponotus obscuripes Are a Different Allometric Morph with Relatively Long Antennae to Communicate with Other Larger Colony Members

1Laboratory of Animal Ecology, Department of Ecology and Systematics, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8589, Japan
2Laboratory of Applied Entomology, Department of Agricultural and Environmental Biology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8657, Japan
3Institute of Entomology, Department of Ecology and Systematics, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8589, Japan
4Department of Neuropharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8638, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Eisuke Hasegawa; pj.ca.iadukoh.rga.ser@esahe

Received 30 March 2017; Revised 19 May 2017; Accepted 28 May 2017; Published 22 June 2017

Academic Editor: Abraham Hefetz

Copyright © 2017 Saori Watanabe et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. E. O. Wilson, The Insect Societies, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass, USA, 1971.
  2. B. Hölldobler and E. O. Wilson, The Ants, Harvard University Press, Harvard, Mass, USA, 1990.
  3. C. Peeters and F. Ito, “Wingless and dwarf workers underlie the ecological success of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae),” Myrmecological News, vol. 21, pp. 117–130, 2015. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. G. F. Oster and E. O. Wilson, Caste and Ecology in The Social Insect, Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, USA, 1978.
  5. E. Hasegawa and S. Imai, “A trade-off between number and size within the first workers of the ant Camponotus japonicus,” Journal of Ethology, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 201–204, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. Y. Okada, H. Fujisawa, Y. Kimura, and E. Hasegawa, “Morph-dependent form of asymmetry in mandibles of the stag beetle Prosopocoilus inclinatus (Coleoptera: Lucanidae),” Ecological Entomology, vol. 33, no. 5, pp. 684–689, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. Y. Okada and E. Hasegawa, “Size-dependent precopulatory behavior as mate-securing tactic in the Japanese stag beetle, Prosopocoilus inclinatus (Coleoptera; Lucanidae),” Journal of Ethology, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 99–102, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. A. Inoue and E. Hasegawa, “Effect of morph types, body size and prior residence on food-site holding by males of the male-dimorphic stag beetle Prosopocoilus inclinatus (Coleoptera: Lucanidae),” Journal of Ethology, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 55–60, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. E. O. Wilson, “The origin and evolution of polymorphism in ants,” The Quarterly Review of Biology, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 136–156, 1953. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. E. O. Wilson, Pheidole in the New World-A Dominant, Hyper Divers Ant Genus, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass, USA, 2003.
  11. J. L. Tomkins, J. S. Kotiaho, and N. R. Lebas, “Matters of scale: positive allometry and the evolution of male dimorphisms,” The American Naturalist, vol. 165, no. 3, pp. 389–402, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. M. Terayama, “The ant genus Camponotus Mayr (Hymenoptera: Japan) in Japan,” Memories of Myrmecological Society of Japan, vol. 1, pp. 25–48, 1999. View at Google Scholar
  13. M. B. Araujo and W. R. Tschinkel, “Worker allometry in relation to colony size and social form in the fire ant solenopsis invicta,” Journal of Insect Science, vol. 10, no. 94, pp. 1–10, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. S. J. Gould, “Allometry and size in ontogeny and phylogeny,” Biological Reviews, vol. 41, no. 4, pp. 387–640, 1966. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. P. H. Harvey and M. D. Pagel, The Comparative Method in Evolutionary Biology, Oxford University Press, New York, NY, USA, 1998.
  16. R. A. Keller, C. Peeters, and P. Beldade, “Evolution of thorax architecture in ant castes highlights trade-off between flight and ground behaviors,” eLife, vol. 2014, no. 3, Article ID e01539, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. J. Goyens, J. Dirckx, and P. Aerts, “Stag Beetle Battle Behavior and its Associated Anatomical Adaptations,” Journal of Insect Behavior, vol. 28, no. 3, article no. 1, pp. 227–244, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. J. Ito, Y. Ohkubo, and E. Hasegawa, “Morph-specific weapon-correlated traits in a male dimophic stag beetle (Coleoptera: Lucanidae),” Annals of Entomological Society of America. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  19. M. Ozaki, A. Wada-Katsumata, K. Fujikawa et al., “Ant nestmate and non-nestmate discrimination by a chemosensory sensillum,” Science, vol. 309, no. 5732, pp. 311–314, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. S. Miyano S, “Amount of flesh food influences the number, larval duration, and body size of first brood workers, in a Japanese paper wasp, Polistes chinensis antennalis (Hymenoptera: Vespidae),” Entomological Science, vol. 1, no. 4, pp. 545–549, 1998. View at Google Scholar