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Volume 2019, Article ID 4939120, 5 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/4939120
Research Article

Follower Position Does Not Affect Waggle Dance Information Transfer

1Department of Entomology, 216 A Price Hall, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA
2Department of Entomology, Citrus Drive, University of California at Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Parry M. Kietzman; ude.tv@yrrap

Received 26 September 2018; Revised 4 January 2019; Accepted 11 February 2019; Published 3 March 2019

Academic Editor: David Roubik

Copyright © 2019 Parry M. Kietzman and P. Kirk Visscher. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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