Psyche: A Journal of Entomology

True Bugs (Heteroptera): Chemical Ecology of Invasive and Emerging Pest Species


Publishing date
18 May 2012
Status
Published
Submission deadline
16 Dec 2011

1Agricultural Research Service (ARS), USDA, Washington, DC 20250, USA

2Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA

3Laboratory of Entomology, Embrapa, National Wheat Center, P.O. Box 451, Passo Fundo, RS, Brazil

4USDA-ARS Agricultural Research Center-West, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA


True Bugs (Heteroptera): Chemical Ecology of Invasive and Emerging Pest Species

Description

True bugs (order Hemiptera: suborder Heteroptera; about 40,000 species) are on the rise as pests because of international transport, insecticide resistance, range expansion due to global warming, and immunity to genetically modified crops (GMOs). Haematophagous bugs suck blood from humans and other animals, and phytophagous species are crop pests. In the past, these insects were checked by insecticides, natural enemies, and winter. For example, bed bugs (Cimicidae) were once effectively controlled by “hard” insecticides, stink bugs (Pentatomidae) were suppressed by insecticides applied against other primary pests, and freezing temperatures blocked semitropical bugs from encroaching into temperate regions. Modern “soft” insecticides are less apt to suppress heteropterans, and bugs themselves have evolved resistance to many insecticides. Bed bugs are resurging worldwide, principally due to insecticidal resistance and airline traffic. Chagas disease, vectored by triatomine bugs, is increasing in the USA through immigration of people from endemic areas. Global warming enables heteropterans to invade new regions; for example, Piezodorus guildinii (Pentatomidae), once uncommon in the USA, is now the main soybean pest in the mid-South. Plant bug (Miridae) and stink bug populations are escalating everywhere GMOs have been adopted, not only because bugs are unaffected by the Bt-endotoxins used to transform crops, but also because the advent of no-till agriculture with herbicide-resistant GMO crops leaves debris and fallen seeds favoring in-field survival of bugs. Finally, although adoption of GMOs has dramatically reduced insecticide usage, this facilitates establishment of invasive species such as the brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys) that is currently wreaking havoc in the USA.

Here we are soliciting original research and review articles on the chemical ecology of Heteroptera. Our hope is that safer, more effective management of true bugs can be achieved by incorporating semiochemicals in lieu of or as complements to insecticidal and other control tactics. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Identification of pheromones and kairomones of invasive and escalating species
  • Semiochemically based monitoring of invasive and emergent heteropterans
  • Case studies and advances in the use of semiochemicals for control
  • Recently developed semiochemical analysis techniques
  • Exploration/discussion of novel approaches to disrupt chemical communication
  • Molecular approaches to manipulate heteropteran symbionts for host suppression
  • Application of chemical signals to spread pathogenic diseases of heteropteran pests

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/psyche/guidelines/. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 925823
  • - Editorial

True Bugs (Heteroptera): Chemical Ecology of Invasive and Emerging Pest Species

Jeffrey R. Aldrich | Jocelyn G. Millar | ... | Mark M. Feldlaufer
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 535062
  • - Research Article

Impact of the Invasive Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål), in Mid-Atlantic Tree Fruit Orchards in the United States: Case Studies of Commercial Management

Tracy C. Leskey | Brent D. Short | ... | Starker E. Wright
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 470436
  • - Review Article

An Insight into the Sialomes of Bloodsucking Heteroptera

José M. C. Ribeiro | Teresa C. Assumpção | Ivo M. B. Francischetti
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 536149
  • - Research Article

Pheromone of the Banana-Spotting Bug, Amblypelta lutescens lutescens Distant (Heteroptera: Coreidae): Identification, Synthesis, and Field Bioassay

Ashot Khrimian | Harry A. C. Fay | ... | Jeffrey R. Aldrich
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 269473
  • - Review Article

Host-Symbiont Interactions for Potentially Managing Heteropteran Pests

Simone Souza Prado | Tiago Domingues Zucchi
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 868474
  • - Research Article

A Male Aggregation Pheromone in the Bronze Bug, Thaumastocoris peregrinus (Thaumastocoridae)

Andrés González | María Victoria Calvo | ... | Gonzalo Martínez
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 275128
  • - Research Article

Volatile Chemicals of Adults and Nymphs of the Eucalyptus Pest, Thaumastocoris peregrinus (Heteroptera: Thaumastocoridae)

Camila B. C. Martins | Rafael A. Soldi | ... | Paulo H. G. Zarbin
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 651015
  • - Review Article

Chemical Ecology of Egg Parasitoids Associated with True Bugs

Eric Conti | Stefano Colazza
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 280340
  • - Research Article

Attractant Pheromone of the Neotropical Species Neomegalotomus parvus (Westwood) (Heteroptera: Alydidae)

Raul Alberto Laumann | Miguel Borges | ... | Maria Carolina Blassioli-Moraes
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 862891
  • - Review Article

The Sexual Behaviour of Chagas' Disease Vectors: Chemical Signals Mediating Communication between Male and Female Triatomine Bugs

Gabriel Manrique | Marcelo Lorenzo
Psyche: A Journal of Entomology
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