Psyche: A Journal of Entomology

Hymenopteran Group foraging and Information Transfer about Resources


Publishing date
01 Aug 2011
Status
Published
Submission deadline
01 Feb 2011

1Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Pará, Rua Augusto Corrêa, No.1, Campus Básico, 66075-110 Belém, PA, Brasil

2Section of Ecology, Behavior, and Evolution, Division of Biological Sciences, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, MC0116, La Jolla, CA 92093-0116, USA

3Laboratory of Apiculture and Social Insects (LASI), Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QG, UK


Hymenopteran Group foraging and Information Transfer about Resources

Description

Hymenopteran communication about the location and quality of food sources and other resources such as building materials and potential nesting sites has been a topic of intense research and interest in biology. Recent advances show that some hymenopteran species (ants, bees, and wasps) can stimulate nestmates to forage, communicate food source location, and exploit it efficiently through the use of several mechanisms, such as visual local enhancement, scent trails, and the waggle dance of Apis spp., and by more subtle methods, like eavesdropping (the interception of signals intended for other receivers), which allows the detection of the location of valuable food sources discovered by other colonies or the detection of potential competitors visiting the desired food source. By knowing the mechanisms and the patterns of collective foraging within the Hymenoptera, we may reach a deeper understanding of their ecology and the important role they play as pollinators (bees, ants, and wasps) and predators (ants and wasps). We invite investigators to contribute both original research and review articles that will stimulate continuing efforts to understand the patterns of collective foraging and resource communication in the several groups that comprise the Hymenoptera. We are interested in papers that improve our understanding of the task partitioning in foraging, mechanisms used to communicate the resource location, how individuals can transfer information about resources to nestmates, how foragers deal with exploitation by competitors, and other current topics in collective foraging. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • The implications of the waggle dance and other dances for resource exploitation in Apis spp.
  • The spatial-temporal characteristics of scent trails
  • Sounds and vibrations as mediators of food source communication in bees and wasps
  • Mechanisms used by hymenopterans to collectively explore a food source
  • Economics of social foraging behavior
  • Mechanisms used by hymenopterans to collectively select and occupy a nesting site
  • Evolution of nesting structure to fit communication modalities
  • Task partitioning in the collective foraging in Hymenoptera
  • Novel methodologies to study collective foraging and food source communication
  • How prior experience or learning, or both, might affect communication
  • The interaction between communication and the environment (i.e., why is one communication mode favored or adaptive in one environment but not in another)

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/psyche/guidelines/. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 392075
  • - Editorial

Hymenopteran Group Foraging and Information Transfer about Resources

Felipe Andrés León Contrera | Margaret J. Couvillon | James Charles Nieh
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 318985
  • - Review Article

Waggle Dances and Azimuthal Windows

O. Duangphakdee | S. E. Radloff | ... | H. R. Hepburn
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 542487
  • - Research Article

Environmental Factors Influencing Foraging Activity in the Social Wasp Polybia paulista (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Epiponini)

Naila Cristina de Souza Canevazzi | Fernando Barbosa Noll
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 501381
  • - Research Article

The Effects of the Social Hierarchy Destabilization on the Foraging Activity of Eusocial Wasp Mischocyttarus cerberus styx Richards, 1940 (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Polistinae)

Vanderlei Conceição Costa Filho | Sulene Noriko Shima | ... | André Sunao Nishiuchi Murakami
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 419793
  • - Research Article

Experimental Wing Damage Affects Foraging Effort and Foraging Distance in Honeybees Apis mellifera

Andrew D. Higginson | Christopher J. Barnard | ... | Francis Ratnieks
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 643127
  • - Research Article

Sequential Load Transport in Grass-Cutting Ants (Atta vollenweideri): Maximization of Plant Delivery Rate or Improved Information Transfer?

Jacqueline Röschard | Flavio Roces
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 107303
  • - Research Article

Pollen Sources for Melipona capixaba Moure & Camargo: An Endangered Brazilian Stingless Bee

Cynthia Fernandes Pinto da Luz | Tânia Maria Fernandes-Salomão | ... | Lucio Antonio de Oliveira Campos
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 139385
  • - Research Article

Trail-Laying Behaviour as a Function of Resource Quality in the Ant Camponotus rufipes

Pablo E. Schilman
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2011
  • - Article ID 378576
  • - Research Article

Recruitment in Swarm-Founding Wasps: Polybia occidentalis Does not Actively Scent-Mark Carbohydrate Food Sources

Benjamin J. Taylor | Erik V. Nordheim | ... | Robert L. Jeanne
Psyche: A Journal of Entomology
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