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Psychiatry Journal
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 698348, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/698348
Review Article

Where Lies the Risk? An Ecological Approach to Understanding Child Mental Health Risk and Vulnerabilities in Sub-Saharan Africa

Department of Behavioural Medicine, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Lagos 10001, Nigeria

Received 28 October 2013; Accepted 21 March 2014; Published 16 April 2014

Academic Editor: Andrew McQuillin

Copyright © 2014 Olayinka Atilola. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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