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Psychiatry Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 897493, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/897493
Research Article

Road Rage: Prevalence Pattern and Web Based Survey Feasibility

1Department of Psychiatry, Lady Hardinge Medical College & Smt. S. K. Hospital, New Delhi 110001, India
2Department of Psychiatry, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029, India

Received 31 October 2013; Revised 16 March 2014; Accepted 16 March 2014; Published 23 April 2014

Academic Editor: Nicola Magnavita

Copyright © 2014 Shaily Mina et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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