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Psychiatry Journal
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1795901, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1795901
Research Article

Enhanced Early Neuronal Processing of Food Pictures in Anorexia Nervosa: A Magnetoencephalography Study

1Oxford Brain-Body Research into Eating Disorders, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7JX, UK
2Oxford Centre for Human Brain Activity, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7JX, UK

Received 29 February 2016; Revised 15 May 2016; Accepted 19 June 2016

Academic Editor: Veit Roessner

Copyright © 2016 Lauren R. Godier et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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