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Psychiatry Journal
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 6867957, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6867957
Clinical Study

Patients’ Experience of Winter Depression and Light Room Treatment

1Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
2Center for Clinical Research Dalarna (CKF), Falun, Sweden
3Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, St. Göran, Stockholm, Sweden

Correspondence should be addressed to Cecilia Rastad; es.anraladtl@datsar.ailicec

Received 30 August 2016; Accepted 4 December 2016; Published 15 February 2017

Academic Editor: Ulrich Schweiger

Copyright © 2017 Cecilia Rastad et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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