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Rehabilitation Research and Practice
Volume 2011, Article ID 313980, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/313980
Research Article

Abnormal Leg Muscle Latencies and Relationship to Dyscoordination and Walking Disability after Stroke

1Research Service 151-W, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, 10701 East Boulevard, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
2Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA

Received 31 August 2010; Revised 10 November 2010; Accepted 19 November 2010

Academic Editor: Arie Rimmerman

Copyright © 2011 Janis J. Daly et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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