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Rehabilitation Research and Practice
Volume 2014, Article ID 973549, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/973549
Research Article

How Important Are Social Support, Expectations and Coping Patterns during Cardiac Rehabilitation

1Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, Research Group of General Practice, University of Bergen, Kalfarveien 31, 5018 Bergen, Norway
2Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Armauer Hansen’s House, Bergen, Norway
3Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, Research Group of Lifestyle Epidemiology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway

Received 30 May 2014; Revised 20 August 2014; Accepted 27 August 2014; Published 15 September 2014

Academic Editor: Francesco Giallauria

Copyright © 2014 Maria J. C. Blikman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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