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Rehabilitation Research and Practice
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 367695, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/367695
Research Article

Subjective Visual Vertical during Caloric Stimulation in Healthy Subjects: Implications to Research and Neurorehabilitation

1Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, 3-48 Corbett Hall, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2G4
2Department of Neuroscience and Behavior, School of Medicine at Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Avenida Dos Bandeirantes 3900, 14049-900 Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil
3Department of Ophthalmology, Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, School of Medicine at Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Avenida Dos Bandeirantes 3900, 14049-900 Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil

Received 13 March 2015; Accepted 13 May 2015

Academic Editor: Nicolas Pinsault

Copyright © 2015 Martha Funabashi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. The subjective visual vertical (SVV) is a perception often impaired in patients with neurologic disorders and is considered a sensitive tool to detect otolithic dysfunctions. However, it remains unclear whether the semicircular canals (SCCs) are also involved in the visual vertical perception. Objective. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of horizontal SCCs on SVV by caloric stimulation in healthy subjects. Methods. SVV was performed before and during the ice-cold caloric stimulation (4°C, right ear) in 30 healthy subjects. Results. The mean SVV tilts before and during the caloric stimulation were 0.31° ± 0.39 and −0.28° ± 0.40, respectively. There was no significant difference between the mean SVV tilts before and during stimulation . Conclusion. These results suggest that horizontal SCCs do not influence SVV. Therefore, investigations and rehabilitation approaches for SVV misperceptions should be focused on otolithic and cognitive strategies.