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Rehabilitation Research and Practice
Volume 2017, Article ID 9569178, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9569178
Research Article

A Mixed Methods Small Pilot Study to Describe the Effects of Upper Limb Training Using a Virtual Reality Gaming System in People with Chronic Stroke

1Department of Health Professions, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M15 6GX, UK
2The Brain and Spinal Injuries Centre, Eccles Old Road, Salford, UK

Correspondence should be addressed to Rachel C. Stockley; ku.ca.umm@yelkcots.r

Received 21 August 2016; Revised 20 December 2016; Accepted 25 December 2016; Published 18 January 2017

Academic Editor: Vincent de Groot

Copyright © 2017 Rachel C. Stockley et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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