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Radiology Research and Practice
Volume 2012, Article ID 268483, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/268483
Review Article

Assessing Cerebrovascular Reactivity in Carotid Steno-Occlusive Disease Using MRI BOLD and ASL Techniques

1Department of Neuroscience and Behavioral Sciences, FMRP, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP 14049-900, Brazil
2Cerebral Microcirculation Unit, Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
3Onofre Lopes University Hospital, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN 59012-300, Brazil
4Brain Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN 59020-130, Brazil

Received 10 February 2012; Revised 17 April 2012; Accepted 17 April 2012

Academic Editor: Kyousuke Kamada

Copyright © 2012 Renata F. Leoni et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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