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Sarcoma
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 627254, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/627254
Review Article

The Genetics of Osteosarcoma

1Department of Paediatric Laboratory Medicine, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X8
2Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 3N6

Received 8 December 2011; Accepted 31 January 2012

Academic Editor: Luca Sangiorgi

Copyright © 2012 Jeff W. Martin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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