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Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 636849, 4 pages
Research Article

Primary Leiomyosarcoma of Bone: Analysis of Prognosis

Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham B31 2AP, UK

Received 15 September 2011; Revised 31 December 2011; Accepted 2 January 2012

Academic Editor: Alessandro Gronchi

Copyright © 2012 P. Brewer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Leiomyosarcoma of bone is just one of the variants of spindle cell sarcoma of bone characterised by the expression of desmin and other markers indicating a significant element of smooth muscle in the tumour, without osteoid production we have investigated the management and outcome of this rare type of primary malignant bone tumour. Method. Retrospective review of data stored on a prospective database. Results. In a database of 3364 patients with primary malignant bone sarcomas, 31 patients were identified with a primary leiomyosarcoma of bone. There were 12 males and 19 females with a mean age of 46 and tumour size of 8 cm. The most common site was the distal femur followed by the proximal tibia. Treatment was with chemotherapy and surgical resection. Seven of the patients had metastases at diagnosis. Surgery was carried out in 28 patients, 8 having amputation and 20 limb salvage. Three patients developed local recurrence, but half developed metastases. All patient disease-specific survival was 57% at five years and 44% at 10 yrs but for those without metastases was 82% and 60%, respectively. The only prognostic factors were metastases at diagnosis. Conclusion. Leiomyosarcoma of bone is a very rare primary malignant bone tumour affecting a predominantly older population. Despite the high incidence of metastases, survival is better than for other bone sarcomas for those without metastases at diagnosis.