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Schizophrenia Research and Treatment
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 581686, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/581686
Review Article

Parietal Lobes in Schizophrenia: Do They Matter?

1Department of Neurology, Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen, 9007 St. Gallen, Switzerland
2Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic, University Hospital Basel, 4031 Basel, Switzerland
3Integrierte Psychiatrie Winterthur, Zurich Unterland, 8408 Winterthur, Switzerland

Received 7 June 2011; Revised 28 July 2011; Accepted 10 August 2011

Academic Editor: Hugo Schnack

Copyright © 2011 Murat Yildiz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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