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Schizophrenia Research and Treatment
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 614730, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/614730
Review Article

Dissecting the Syndrome of Schizophrenia: Progress toward Clinically Useful Biomarkers

1The Rebecca L. Cooper Research Laboratories, The Mental Health Research Institute, Locked bag 11, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia
2The Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia

Received 18 December 2010; Revised 28 March 2011; Accepted 7 April 2011

Academic Editor: Vaibhav A. Diwadkar

Copyright © 2011 Brian Dean. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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