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Schizophrenia Research and Treatment
Volume 2017, Article ID 7203871, 15 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7203871
Research Article

Improving Theory of Mind in Schizophrenia by Targeting Cognition and Metacognition with Computerized Cognitive Remediation: A Multiple Case Study

1École de Psychologie, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada G1V 0A6
2Centre de Recherche de l’Institut Universitaire en Santé Mentale de Québec, Québec, QC, Canada G1J 2G3
3Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London, London SE5 8AF, UK
4Département de Psychiatrie et Neurosciences, Faculté de Médecine, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada G1V 0A6

Correspondence should be addressed to Amélie M. Achim; ac.lavalu.demf@mihca.eilema

Received 1 August 2016; Accepted 15 December 2016; Published 26 January 2017

Academic Editor: Nakao Iwata

Copyright © 2017 Élisabeth Thibaudeau et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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