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Stem Cells International
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 235176, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/235176
Research Article

Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Enhances Expansion of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells without Diminishing Their Immunosuppressive Potential

1Divisions of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology and Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
2Hathaway Brown School, 19600 North Park Boulevard, Shaker Heights, OH 44122, USA
3Skeletal Research Center, Department of Biology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7080, USA
4Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of General Medical Sciences, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
5BioMimetic Therapeutics, Inc., Franklin, TN 37067, USA

Received 18 July 2010; Accepted 13 January 2011

Academic Editor: Amin Rahemtulla

Copyright © 2011 Jeffery J. Auletta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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