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Stem Cells International
Volume 2011, Article ID 393698, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/393698
Review Article

Phase I/II Clinical Trials Using Gene-Modified Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cells for HIV: Lessons Learnt

1Center for Clinical AIDS Research and Education (CARE Center), University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90035, USA
2Departments of Medicine and of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
3SpanCyte Pty Ltd., B.O. Box 960, Sydney, Leichhardt, NSW 2040, Australia
4Faculty of Medicine and Centre for Applied Medical Research, St. Vincent's Hospital, The University of New South Wales, Kensington, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia

Received 10 January 2011; Accepted 15 March 2011

Academic Editor: Dominique Bonnet

Copyright © 2011 Ronald T. Mitsuyasu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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