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Stem Cells International
Volume 2012, Article ID 353491, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/353491
Research Article

Neurally Derived Tissues in Xenopus laevis Embryos Exhibit a Consistent Bioelectrical Left-Right Asymmetry

Department of Biology and Tufts Center for Regenerative and Developmental Biology, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155, USA

Received 19 September 2012; Accepted 7 November 2012

Academic Editor: Alexander Kleger

Copyright © 2012 Vaibhav P. Pai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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