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Stem Cells International
Volume 2012, Article ID 412040, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/412040
Review Article

Cellular Programming and Reprogramming: Sculpting Cell Fate for the Production of Dopamine Neurons for Cell Therapy

1Laboratory of Stem Cells and Neural Repair, Fundacion Inbiomed, Paseo Mikeletegi 81, 20009 San Sebastian, Spain
2Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Retzius Road 8, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden

Received 18 March 2012; Accepted 5 July 2012

Academic Editor: Marcel M. Daadi

Copyright © 2012 Julio C. Aguila et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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