Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Stem Cells International
Volume 2012, Article ID 741810, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/741810
Review Article

Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells: Future Perspectives

1Institute of Medical Genetics, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Strasse 10, 1090 Vienna, Austria
2Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna, Austria

Received 2 March 2012; Accepted 12 April 2012

Academic Editor: Mahmud Bani

Copyright © 2012 Margit Rosner et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. H. Hoehn and D. Salk, “Morphological and biochemical heterogeneity of amniotic fluid cells in culture,” Methods in Cell Biology, vol. 26, pp. 12–34, 1982. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. C. M. Gosden, “Amniotic fluid cell types and culture,” British Medical Bulletin, vol. 39, no. 4, pp. 348–354, 1983. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. C. Gundacker, H. Dolznig, M. Mikula, M. Rosner, O. Brandau, and M. Hengstschläger, “Amniotic fluid stem cell-based models to study the effects of gene mutations and toxicants on male germ cell formation,” Asian Journal of Andrology, vol. 14, pp. 247–250, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  4. A. Kaviani, T. E. Perry, A. Dzakovic, R. W. Jennings, M. M. Ziegler, and D. O. Fauza, “The amniotic fluid as a source of cells for fetal tissue engineering,” Journal of Pediatric Surgery, vol. 36, no. 11, pp. 1662–1665, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. A. R. Prusa and M. Hengstschläger, “Amniotic fluid cells and human stem cell research—a new connection,” Medical Science Monitor, vol. 8, no. 11, pp. RA253–RA257, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. A. R. Prusa, E. Marton, M. Rosner, G. Bernaschek, and M. Hengstschläger, “Oct-4-expressing cells in human amniotic fluid: a new source for stem cell research?” Human Reproduction, vol. 18, no. 7, pp. 1489–1493, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. A. R. Prusa, E. Marton, M. Rosner, A. Freilinger, G. Bernaschek, and M. Hengstschläger, “Stem cell marker expression in human trisomy 21 amniotic fluid cells and trophoblasts,” Journal of Neural Transmission, vol. 67, supplement, pp. 235–242, 2003. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. M. Rosner, H. Dolznig, K. Schipany, M. Mikula, O. Brandau, and M. Hengstschläger, “Human amniotic fluid stem cells as a model for functional studies of genes involved in human genetic diseases or oncogenesis,” Oncotarget, vol. 2, pp. 705–712, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  9. P. S. In 't Anker, S. A. Scherjon, C. Kleijburg-van der Keur et al., “Amniotic fluid as a novel source of mesenchymal stem cells for therapeutic transplantation [1],” Blood, vol. 102, no. 4, pp. 1548–1549, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. M. S. Tsai, J. L. Lee, Y. J. Chang, and S. M. Hwang, “Isolation of human multipotent mesenchymal stem cells from second-trimester amniotic fluid using a novel two-stage culture protocol,” Human Reproduction, vol. 19, no. 6, pp. 1450–1456, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. K. R. Karlmark, A. Freilinger, E. Marton, M. Rosner, G. Lubec, and M. Hengstschläger, “Activation of ectopic Oct-4 and Rex-1 promoters in human amniotic fluid cells,” International Journal of Molecular Medicine, vol. 16, no. 6, pp. 987–992, 2005. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. P. Bossolasco, T. Montemurro, L. Cova et al., “Molecular and phenotypic characterization of human amniotic fluid cells and their differentiation potential,” Cell Research, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 329–336, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. J. Kim, Y. Lee, H. Kim et al., “Human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells have characteristics of multipotent stem cells,” Cell Proliferation, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 75–90, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. P. De Coppi, G. Bartsch, M. M. Siddiqui et al., “Isolation of amniotic stem cell lines with potential for therapy,” Nature Biotechnology, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 100–106, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. A. R. Prusa, E. Marton, M. Rosner et al., “Neurogenic cells in human amniotic fluid,” American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 191, no. 1, pp. 309–314, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. A. K. Rehni, N. Singh, A. S. Jaggi, and M. Singh, “Amniotic fluid derived stem cells ameliorate focal cerebral ischaemia-reperfusion injury induced behavioural deficits in mice,” Behavioural Brain Research, vol. 183, no. 1, pp. 95–100, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. Y. M. Kolambkar, A. Peister, S. Soker, A. Atala, and R. E. Guldberg, “Chondrogenic differentiation of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells,” Journal of Molecular Histology, vol. 38, no. 5, pp. 405–413, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. M. Orciani, M. Emanuelli, C. Martino, A. Pugnaloni, A. L. Tranquilli, and R. Di Primio, “Potential role of culture mediums for successful isolation and neuronal differentiation of amniotic fluid stem cells,” International Journal of Immunopathology and Pharmacology, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 595–602, 2008. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. M. Rosner, M. Mikula, A. Preitschopf, M. Feichtinger, K. Schipany, and M. Hengstschläger, “Neurogenic differentiation of amniotic fluid stem cells,” Amino Acids, pp. 1–6, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. A. Valli, M. Rosner, C. Fuchs et al., “Embryoid body formation of human amniotic fluid stem cells depends on mTOR,” Oncogene, vol. 29, no. 7, pp. 966–977, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. M. Rosner, N. Siegel, C. Fuchs, N. Slabina, H. Dolznig, and M. Hengstschläger, “Efficient siRNA-mediated prolonged gene silencing in human amniotic fluid stem cells,” Nature Protocols, vol. 5, no. 6, pp. 1081–1095, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. K. Kim, A. Doi, B. Wen et al., “Epigenetic memory in induced pluripotent stem cells,” Nature, vol. 467, no. 7313, pp. 285–290, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. L. C. Laurent, I. Ulitsky, I. Slavin et al., “Dynamic changes in the copy number of pluripotency and cell proliferation genes in human ESCs and iPSCs during reprogramming and time in culture,” Cell Stem Cell, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 106–118, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. M. Rosner, K. Schipany, C. Gundacker et al., “Renal differentiation of amniotic fluid stem cells: perspectives for clinical application and for studies on specific human genetic diseases,” European Journal of Clinical Investigation. In press. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  25. S. Da Sacco, S. Sedrakyan, F. Boldrin et al., “Human amniotic fluid as a potential new source of organ specific precursor cells for future regenerative medicine applications,” Journal of Urology, vol. 183, no. 3, pp. 1193–1200, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. N. Siegel, A. Valli, C. Fuchs, M. Rosner, and M. Hengstschläger, “Induction of mesenchymal/epithelial marker expression in human amniotic fluid stem cells,” Reproductive Biomedicine Online, vol. 19, no. 6, pp. 838–846, 2009. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. L. Perin, S. Giuliani, D. Jin et al., “Renal differentiation of amniotic fluid stem cells,” Cell Proliferation, vol. 40, no. 6, pp. 936–948, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. N. Siegel, M. Rosner, M. Unbekandt et al., “Contribution of human amniotic fluid stem cells to renal tissue formation depends on mTOR,” Human Molecular Genetics, vol. 19, no. 17, pp. 3320–3331, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. L. Perin, S. Sedrakyan, S. Giuliani et al., “Protective effect of human amniotic fluid stem cells in an immunodeficient mouse model of acute tubular necrosis,” PLoS ONE, vol. 5, no. 2, Article ID e9357, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. P. V. Hauser, R. De Fazio, S. Bruno et al., “Stem cells derived from human amniotic fluid contribute to acute kidney injury recovery,” American Journal of Pathology, vol. 177, no. 4, pp. 2011–2021, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. V. B. Mattis and C. N. Svendsen, “Induced pluripotent stem cells: a new revolution for clinical neurology?” The Lancet Neurology, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 383–394, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. C. Fuchs, M. Rosner, H. Dolznig, M. Mikula, N. Kramer, and M. Hengstschläger, “Tuberin and PRAS40 are anti-apoptotic gatekeepers during early human amniotic fluid stem cell differentiation,” Human Molecular Genetics, vol. 21, pp. 1049–1061, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  33. H. Zhu, M. W. Lensch, P. Cahan, and G. Q. Daley, “Investigating monogenic and complex diseases with pluripotent stem cells,” Nature Reviews Genetics, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 266–275, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. K. D. Sermon, C. Simon, P. Braude, S. Viville, J. Borstlap, and A. Veiga, “Creation of a registry for human embryonic stem cells carrying an inherited defect: joint collaboration between ESHRE and hESCreg,” Human Reproduction, vol. 24, no. 7, pp. 1556–1560, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. I. H. Park, N. Arora, H. Huo et al., “Disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells,” Cell, vol. 134, no. 5, pp. 877–886, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus