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Stem Cells International
Volume 2013, Article ID 784629, 25 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/784629
Research Article

Microarray-Based Comparisons of Ion Channel Expression Patterns: Human Keratinocytes to Reprogrammed hiPSCs to Differentiated Neuronal and Cardiac Progeny

1Institute for Anatomy Cell Biology, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein Allee 11, 89081 Ulm, Germany
2Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen, Germany
3Department of Internal Medicine I, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein Allee 11, 89081 Ulm, Germany

Received 31 January 2013; Accepted 6 March 2013

Academic Editor: Michael Levin

Copyright © 2013 Leonhard Linta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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