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Stem Cells International
Volume 2014, Article ID 761091, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/761091
Review Article

Concise Review: Mesenchymal Stem Cells Ameliorate Tissue Injury via Secretion of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Stimulated Protein/Gene 6

Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, 301 Yanchang Middle Road, Shanghai 200072, China

Received 19 September 2014; Revised 22 November 2014; Accepted 30 November 2014; Published 15 December 2014

Academic Editor: Benedetta Bussolati

Copyright © 2014 Zhigang He et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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