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Stem Cells International
Volume 2015, Article ID 105172, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/105172
Review Article

Neural Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Nontherapeutic Applications: Toxicology, Pharmacology, and In Vitro Disease Modeling

1Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science & Technology, Sunway University, No. 5 Jalan Universiti, 47500 Bandar Sunway, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia
2Department of Physiology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong
3School of Chemical & Life Sciences, Nanyang Polytechnic, 180 Ang Mo Kio Avenue 8, Singapore 569830
4Jeffrey Cheah School of Medicine, Monash University Malaysia, Jalan Lagoon Selatan, 47500 Bandar Sunway, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia
5Department of Biosystems Science & Engineering (D-BSSE), ETH-Zurich, Mattenstrasse 26, 4058 Basel, Switzerland

Received 25 March 2015; Revised 6 May 2015; Accepted 12 May 2015

Academic Editor: James Adjaye

Copyright © 2015 May Shin Yap et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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