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Stem Cells International
Volume 2015, Article ID 137164, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/137164
Review Article

Stem Cell Hierarchy and Clonal Evolution in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

1Department of Hematology/Oncology, Goethe University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main, Germany
2LOEWE Center for Cell and Gene Therapy Frankfurt, Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main, Germany
3German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany
4German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany

Received 17 April 2015; Revised 16 June 2015; Accepted 17 June 2015

Academic Editor: Franca Fagioli

Copyright © 2015 Fabian Lang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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