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Stem Cells International
Volume 2015, Article ID 140170, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/140170
Research Article

Intravenous Administration of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induces a Switch from Classical to Atypical Symptoms in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

1Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Los Andes, 750000 Santiago, Chile
2Laboratory of Integrative and Molecular Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Los Andes, 750000 Santiago, Chile
3Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Andrés Bello National University, 8370146 Santiago, Chile

Received 13 November 2014; Revised 23 January 2015; Accepted 23 January 2015

Academic Editor: Gary E. Lyons

Copyright © 2015 Mónica Kurte et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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