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Stem Cells International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 382530, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/382530
Review Article

Applications of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Studying the Neurodegenerative Diseases

1Department of Neurology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China
2State Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology, Department of Neurobiology and Institutes of Brain Science, School of Basic Medical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China
3Department of Perinatal Medicine, Pregnancy Research Centre and University of Melbourne Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Royal Women’s Hospital, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia
4Shanghai Institute of Geriatrics, Huadong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040, China
5School of Acupuncture, Massage and Rehabilitation, Yunnan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Kunming 650500, China

Received 27 September 2014; Accepted 5 December 2014

Academic Editor: Abhijit De

Copyright © 2015 Wenbin Wan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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