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Stem Cells International
Volume 2015, Article ID 496512, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/496512
Research Article

Particle Radiation-Induced Nontargeted Effects in Bone-Marrow-Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cells

1Cardiovascular Research Center, GeneSys Research Institute, Boston, MA 02135, USA
2Whitaker Cardiovascular Institute, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118, USA
3Department of Integrated Mathematical Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL 33612, USA
4Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118, USA

Received 29 December 2014; Revised 23 February 2015; Accepted 24 February 2015

Academic Editor: Daniele Avitabile

Copyright © 2015 Sharath P. Sasi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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