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Stem Cells International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 628368, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/628368
Review Article

Alkaline Phosphatase in Stem Cells

1Institute of Experimental Biology, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno, Czech Republic
2Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Královopolská 135, 612 65 Brno, Czech Republic
3Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno, Czech Republic
4International Clinical Research Center, Center of Biomolecular and Cellular Engineering, St. Anne’s University Hospital Brno, Pekařská 53, 656 91 Brno, Czech Republic

Received 10 November 2014; Accepted 21 January 2015

Academic Editor: Kenneth R. Boheler

Copyright © 2015 Kateřina Štefková et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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