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Stem Cells International
Volume 2015, Article ID 948040, 24 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/948040
Review Article

Hydrogels and Cell Based Therapies in Spinal Cord Injury Regeneration

1Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS), School of Health Sciences, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal
2ICVS/3B’s, PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga/Guimarães, Portugal

Received 8 September 2014; Accepted 14 December 2014

Academic Editor: Pavla Jendelova

Copyright © 2015 Rita C. Assunção-Silva et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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