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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 1319578, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1319578
Research Article

Expression of CD24 in Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Is Regulated by TGFβ3 and Induces a Myofibroblast-Like Genotype

1Trauma Department, Hannover Medical School, 30625 Hannover, Germany
2Institute of Laboratory Animal Science, Hannover Medical School, 30625 Hannover, Germany
3Cellular Neurophysiology, Hannover Medical School, 30625 Hannover, Germany

Received 15 June 2015; Revised 11 August 2015; Accepted 12 August 2015

Academic Editor: Franca Fagioli

Copyright © 2016 Luisa Marilena Schäck et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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