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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1375031, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1375031
Research Article

Whole-Genome Expression Analysis and Signal Pathway Screening of Synovium-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis

Department of Orthopedics, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 107 Yan Jiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, China

Received 8 April 2016; Revised 25 June 2016; Accepted 29 June 2016

Academic Editor: Armand Keating

Copyright © 2016 Jingyi Hou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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