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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 1681590, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1681590
Review Article

A Common Language: How Neuroimmunological Cross Talk Regulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

1Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01307 Dresden, Germany
2German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) Dresden, 01307 Dresden, Germany

Received 2 December 2015; Accepted 17 March 2016

Academic Editor: Yang D. Teng

Copyright © 2016 Odette Leiter et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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