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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 2018474, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2018474
Research Article

Effects of Magnetically Guided, SPIO-Labeled, and Neurotrophin-3 Gene-Modified Bone Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Rat Model of Spinal Cord Injury

1Department of Radiology, First Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001, China
2Department of Molecular Biology, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030001, China

Received 9 February 2015; Revised 30 March 2015; Accepted 31 March 2015

Academic Editor: Jianjun Guan

Copyright © 2016 Rui-Ping Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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