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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 2019498, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2019498
Research Article

Senescence-Associated Molecular and Epigenetic Alterations in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Cultures from Amniotic Fluid of Normal and Fetus-Affected Pregnancy

Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius University, LT-10257 Vilnius, Lithuania

Received 27 May 2016; Accepted 25 August 2016

Academic Editor: Gary E. Lyons

Copyright © 2016 Jūratė Savickienė et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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